• October 21, 2019 at 1:58 am#40943
    Dennis Cook
    Deckhand
    @cookietx

    Where are the best places to look for good used vessels.  Our plans are to retire, live aboard and sail the area in the next two years.  We will probably use Thailand a a home base at the beginning.  Any recommendations for markets to check out for someone on a limited budget?

    October 21, 2019 at 11:58 am#40993
    Jamie
    Skipper
    @jamie-ftb

    There are plenty of used boats for sail in SE Asia but I would say most of them are Langkawi in Malaysia and Phuket in Thailand. Agents like Paul Jackson, who is based at the Royal Langkawi Yacht Club, will cover most areas of Malaysia. I don’t have personal experience of agents in Phuket but there are many. Whilst you won’t have so much to choose from compared to the States or Europe, there are still many options and some bargains to pick up.

    A rather more extreme option but one you may wish to consider is to broaden your search, buy elsewhere, and then sail to Thailand. I’m not necessarily suggesting the States but you might find your ‘ideal’ boat in Australia, in which case you purchase it there and sail it up to Thailand, a popular passage for Aussie sailors. That said, a nice shake-down passage from west coast States across the Pacific could be fun! You might also wish to consider hiring a delivery skipper to move the boat from abroad to SE Asia, but that will add to your budget.

    Whether you wish to sail to SE Asia from another country, or purchase in the area, then http://www.yachtworld.com is a good place to do some window shopping. Not only is this useful to identify what kind of boat you’re interested in, it might help identify a specific boat for sale in that area. You’ll also be able to compare market prices.

    Whilst it may be expensive or difficult to organise, a trip to Malaysia/Thailand is a good starting point. It’s easy to do a circuit of Langkawi and then the Krabi/Phuket peninsular over a long weekend (I know because that’s what I did when researching boat yards). At least then you’re able to make face-to-face contact with agents. They’ll take you more seriously if they meet you in person and will be more proactive in keeping an eye out for you. Also if you pop into the various marinas you may find boats not marketed with agents, preferring privates sales, and if you head to the bar or chandlery, you could get chatting to someone who knows of a boat for sale that hasn’t yet been put on the market. That is not unusual.

    Agents will take a cut so you can minimise that cost by buying privately. There are a few websites out there like http://www.yachtworld.com that list private sales. And don’t forget the listed price is rarely the purchase price. Go in low!

    I don’t know your time-scale or if you’ve started looking already, Dennis, but some boats sit on the hard for ages, others are snapped up immediately, so there is no harm in starting your search now.

    If you have any more questions, fire away. Good luck!

    Peace and fair winds!

    October 23, 2019 at 4:50 pm#41094
    Liz
    Admiral
    @liz-cleere

    Where are the best places to look for good used vessels.

    I agree with everything Jamie says, and would reiterate that it’s worth looking now. Most used boats require a certain amount of  refitting and maintenance before you can sail off into the blue. In some cases it’s a lot of (expensive) work. In our experience the best place in SE Asia to get work done is Thailand.

    The last thing you want to do is buy your beautiful boat and then spend the next six months on the hard in a boat yard…

    Peace and fair winds!

    October 31, 2019 at 5:57 am#41489
    Red Ranger
    Bosun
    @redranger

    Don’t know your thoughts on wooden boats, we would like to live aboard for extended periods and might consider wood as you can get a lot of boat for the money, and also a lot of head ache. But some relief from watching this east coast Shipwright replacing planks and doing cool stuff. All easy when you know how, lol.

     

    Tipsfromashipwright.com

     

     

    November 4, 2019 at 9:31 am#41642
    Liz
    Admiral
    @liz-cleere

    and also a lot of head ache.

    You said it! I’d have a wooden boat for the sheer beauty, but having spent a good deal of time in boat yards watching the maintenance required for then, I’d have to say no. 😉

    Peace and fair winds!

    November 6, 2019 at 7:11 am#41710
    Peter Haliburton
    Deckhand
    @jphaliburton

    A couple years ago I was seriously considering buying a 1966 John Alden Mistral 36, but even though the hull is fiberglass, the time and expense to return all the wood to the condition it was in when this picture was taken is beyond my resources. It is one of those “if I ever won the lottery” things.

    Living and sailing in Newfoundland, Canada

    November 9, 2019 at 7:11 pm#41834
    Peter Haliburton
    Deckhand
    @jphaliburton

    The picture link didn’t work. I’ll try a different method.

    1966 John Alden Mistral 36

    Living and sailing in Newfoundland, Canada

    November 29, 2019 at 2:14 am#42721
    Ben van Staveren
    Bosun
    @benvanstaveren

    I would also venture a look at Indonesia – it’s not as well-established as Malaysia or Thailand for yacht brokers, but there are occasionally quite nice boats for sale. Just, well, do your due diligence because the rules in Indonesia tend to be a little on the fast and loose side.

    Malaysia or Thailand though are the two places to be, Langkawi in Malaysia in particular has a rather bustling yacht market, and pretty much all the yards and chandleries you could want. Then again, Thailand also has them. Guess in the end it boils down to where you find your dream boat.

    Do keep in mind, as others have said, there are occasionally great boats for sale that are going cheap; but they usually go cheap for a reason. Whether that is because it’s got a metric ton of maintenance to be done on it, or the entire interior needs re-done is one of those things that you’ll have to decide for yourself if it’s worth it in time and money. Expect labor costs to be lower than in the West, but it’ll still add up to a pretty significant chunk of change. Unless you do all the work yourself at which point you’re looking at material cost only, of course 🙂

     

    November 29, 2019 at 9:17 am#42734
    Liz
    Admiral
    @liz-cleere

    Guess in the end it boils down to where you find your dream boat.

    When we were boat hunting we started off in the UK. But once we worked out what we wanted we started to look over the world for the right boat. We figured it didn’t really matter where we started since we were going to be living aboard full time. We found SY Esper in Turkey, and that was serendipitous as it turned out that we absolutely LOVED Turkey! It also meant we set off eastwards, rather than going back through the Mediterranean where we had both been lots of times already. 😊

    Peace and fair winds!

    November 30, 2019 at 2:10 pm#42748
    Dennis Cook
    Deckhand
    @cookietx

    Travdling East from Turkey, did you take the Suez then on through to the Indian Ocean? Is that a course you could recommend now?

    November 30, 2019 at 5:11 pm#42766
    Liz
    Admiral
    @liz-cleere

    Is that a course you could recommend now?

    It is the passage we took in 2010 before the Arab Spring began. But we were advised against it, and the trip turned out to be extremely dangerous and stressful once we passed the Bab al-Mandab Strait. There were several attacks as we went through in the GOA, Somalia and later off the Oman coast. I wouldn’t want to repeat that.

    Now? The short answer is I don’t know. Apart from choosing the right weather window to make this passage (read Morgan & Davies ‘Red Sea Pilot’ – an essential tool for this passage) you have to keep really up to date with the piracy situation and that’s something we are out of touch with now. One useful source is the ICC Live Piracy Map. But also try sailing forums, FB sailing forums and reliable news media services. If you are in the Med there are always cruisers with a view on this subject.

    Having said all that, it was an incredible journey to places we never imagined seeing: Sudan, Eritrea, Yemen were extraordinarily exotic and untouched with the most welcoming and friendly of people. We would love to go there again one day, the sea is the most abundant we’ve ever encountered and you could pull out a big fish every 20 minutes if you wanted to.

    Sorry not to be any more helpful.

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by Liz.

    Peace and fair winds!

    December 1, 2019 at 6:01 am#42778
    Ben van Staveren
    Bosun
    @benvanstaveren

    Funny because I recall having sent Jamie an email about this not too long ago because our “goal” is to end up in SE Asia, and currently we’re thinking about going the long way around from the Med via Caribbean/Panama Canal/Australia, mostly because the situation around the Suez canal and pretty much the entire stretch up until you get near India makes me uncomfortable with the idea. I’d entertain going to South Africa and then up via Madagascar and all, but as far as I’ve been able to find the general wind direction and the weather aren’t exactly working with you for an Easterly route.

    So we will probably take the long way around, at some point. Would still be interested going the East way though, just not sure how to pull that off 😀

    (little off topic, sorry…)

    December 2, 2019 at 11:20 am#42794
    Liz
    Admiral
    @liz-cleere

    will probably take the long way around, at some point

    That’s the well-sailed option and is perfectly do-able. We’d probably go that way if we were in your situation. It was a toss up for us about whether to go east or west from Turkey. In the end we went east because we felt we were already facing that way. Haha!

    Peace and fair winds!

    December 4, 2019 at 4:31 am#42810
    Ben van Staveren
    Bosun
    @benvanstaveren

    Eh, good enough reason 😀 For us it’s more a toss-up between getting to SE Asia in 2021 or it taking longer, but I think after a chat over some wine we will go the west route since we’ve both never been to the Caribbean, and I do want to visit Curacao (got some friends there). So I guess it will take longer to get to SE Asia, but it’s not like we’re in a hurry to get anywhere particular any time soon 😀

    Plus we’ll be banging around the Med (figuratively, I hope) for a year or so, I personally haven’t sailed anything in the past 15 years, my girlfriend has no experience at all, so we’ll be taking it slow and learning by doing. I just need to get my VHF certificate sorted out, and then I’m all paperworked up and will supposedly know what I’m doing… (I can rant and rave about the ICC for days, let me tell you…)

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