• February 9, 2021 at 9:22 am#48769
    Dan Herman
    Bosun
    @radiocblue

    How do you stay prepared for a natural disaster like an earthquake or tsunami?

    February 9, 2021 at 11:07 am#48775
    Jamie
    Skipper
    @jamie-ftb

    Good question, Dan. I guess the short answer is, you can’t.

    When we were on land in Thailand we would scope out the tsunami shelters, which were erected after the 2004 disaster. Of course, they were built at the highest land point so they were easy to spot. Also learning about how a tsunami manifests itself on the shoreline is good to know (i.e. when the seas receded, something is afoot).

    At anchor or at sea it might be a different story. If there are warnings then we would weigh anchor and go out to sea. We know of boats that were at anchor in the 2004 tsunami who escaped unscathed as the waves went beneath their keel in deeper waters.

    I did download an earthquake app that gives real-time warnings around the world, but to be honest, by the time you receive an update, it’ll be too late.

    I remember one-time dropping hook in an anchorage as the earthquake warning PA system started sounding. I was terrified and froze, unsure what to do. It was only after a couple of minutes that I caught the PA announcement ending the warning with “this is a test”!

    Peace and fair winds!

    February 13, 2021 at 12:56 am#48788
    David Johnston
    Bosun
    @davidj

    My sister-in-law was working at a hotel in Phuket during the 2004 tsunami and randomly/luckily had chosen that day to go out on a boat for brunch since she had the day off. She was on that boat when the tsunami hit and didn’t realize the severity of what was going on or how bad the devastation was going to be once she returned. My wife’s family couldn’t make contact for days because all the communications infrastructure was destroyed. Anyway, that convinced me that deep water is probably the safest place to be. That’s probably particularly true on a boat, since you’ve probably got supplies and ability to travel over water away from the disaster zone if needed.

    February 15, 2021 at 5:25 pm#48830
    Jamie
    Skipper
    @jamie-ftb

    We met a lady on Asu, which is just before the Mentawais. She told us about her experience of the 2004 tsunami, along with the aftershock that happened a few weeks later. The waters receded and all the villages jumped into the fishing boats and went out to sea. They lost the entire reef on the west side of the island, which literally lifted up out the water, and gained an extra 50m of beach on the east side!

    Peace and fair winds!

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