• May 22, 2020 at 11:35 am#46868
    wbilko
    Bosun
    @wbilko

    Hi, guys.
    We’re longtime followers, new patrons, and just want to say how much we love your channel!  We’ve bought an old Moody 422 here, just in time for lockdown, and wonder if there is any local knowledge you can pass our way re anchorages and suppliers. Any info would be greatly appreciated, as we hope to follow your footsteps of the past several years, including heading north to Thailand, then sailing our “new” boat back to Vancouver.  Can’t wait for you to lead the way!

    FW&FS, Wayne and Alicia

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    May 22, 2020 at 12:15 pm#46883
    Jamie
    Skipper
    @jamie-ftb

    Hi Wayne and Alicia and welcome aboard! Thanks for joining us. We know the Moody 422 quite well as we were moored up next to one in Turkey. We looked at Moodys when we started our own boat hunt and loved them.

    We would be more than happy to share anchorage recommendations but you didn’t say where you are currently. I’m assuming somewhere in Malaysia, perhaps? Let us know and we’ll fill you in on anything we can to help get you going. We’ve spent plenty of time cruising Malaysia and Thailand on the west coast and know the area well.

    Congratulations on the boat purchase. Exciting times ahead!

    Peace and fair winds!

    May 22, 2020 at 5:01 pm#46884
    wbilko
    Bosun
    @wbilko

    Hi, Jamie

    Sorry I didn’t mention we’re currently in Singapore, trying to work here for a year or two while fixing up the old girl.  Thanks for the very quick response, and we look forward with great anticipation to hearing from you again!

    Wayne

    May 22, 2020 at 5:06 pm#46885
    wbilko
    Bosun
    @wbilko

    And the best of luck to you in these trying times! Let me know if we can be of any help to you from here.

    Cheers

    May 23, 2020 at 7:19 am#46888
    Jamie
    Skipper
    @jamie-ftb

    Either you changed the title of your post or I’m a complete idiot for not noticing that you clearly state “Hi from Singapore”! I’m guessing I hadn’t had my third cup of coffee, which is a requirement for my brain to engage. This happens frequently.

    Plenty to give you advice on, assuming you’re heading up the west side of Malaysia. I’m on my phone right now so I’ll boot up the laptop later and pen a proper response… but not before that third cup of coffee 😁

    Peace and fair winds!

    May 23, 2020 at 10:57 am#46892
    Jamie
    Skipper
    @jamie-ftb

    OK, so I’ve had a think about your future cruising plans and here are some notes to get you going. Feel free to reply with further questions or clarification.

    WEATHER

    As you’re aware we’re now in the SW monsoon. This brings unsettled/heavy weather from the SW. However it is not unusual to have days, sometimes weeks, of clement weather with the odd afternoon squall coming in, which are hard to predict. I recommend using the Rain Viewer or Windy app to get real-time sat data of rain patterns. Much better than weekly GRIB forecasts. The main issue for you starting your passage north are the sumatras. These build quickly from the west and can be fierce. They don’t last long but expect winds of over 30kn. They normally happen around dusk/nighttime.

    SEASTATE

    Despite all this weather the sea-state south of Penang is a bit more settled, until a sumatra or strong winds disturb things. Because the SW is pushing the Indian Ocean NE, you won’t feel that effect until you pass Penang, which is appro same latitude as the tip of Sumatra. After that it can get more choppy. However the winds can come from the north too and these can make the Malaka Straits quite uncomfortable. There tends to be a NW swell that is constant throughout the seasons, but again you can have flat calm days too.

    SHIPPING AND FISHING BOATS

    Fortunately you can stay outside of the shipping lane in either direction but watch out for tugs. They don’t appear on AIS but they are normally well lit. Expect to see quite a few outside of the shipping lane with 200m tows. There are fewer fishing boats in the lower half of the straits but as you venture north you’ll see more of them and also fishing nets and pots. If at night they are normally lit but some are surface nets and some sink so avoid them if you can. You’ll see more and more fishing fleets as you go north and they may appear to behave erratically. Don’t worry, they’re not after you but they don’t care about you either so give them a wide berth when you can. Expect to see lots of MoBs on your AIS, which the fishing fleets use as a meeting point!

    ANCHORING

    Anchoring is possible almost anywhere up the coast. It is shallow (5m+) for a good mile offshore. Providing the seastate is calm you can pretty much dump your anchor anywhere outside of the shipping lane. Just make sure you light your boat up like a Christmas tree. Lots of flashing lights as well as your anchor light. When our engine broke down we ended up anchoring 200m off the shipping lane in choppy water. It was uncomfortable but we held ok, it’s all mud and good holding.

    There are, unfortunately, few protected places to anchor going up that coast, especially before Pangkor. Some opt to do night passages, whilst others won’t because of unseen objects and nets in the water. It’s your call but unless you’re happy anchoring in open waters you may have to do the odd night passage.

    MARINAS

    You’ll probably be hopping between marinas for the first part. After Singapore there is Port Dickson. There’s nowhere to anchor outside of it that is protected. It’s a decent marina with a pool and the town has many great restaurants.

    Pangkor is a great marina run by James Khoo. It has haul-out facilities and lots of services like stainless, painting etc. You may anchor outside the marina too but make sure you enter from the shipping lane going due east pointing at the marina as it gets a bit shallow. Pangkor island also has some anchorages depending upon wind and sea state.

    Next jump is up to Penang. A few places to anchor there down the east side after going under the bridges, though the Penang authorities have been a bit harsh on yachties lately. There is Straits Quay marina on the NE corner. Hard to get in to so book in advance, and take John a bottle of whisky 😉

    After Penang there are some islands 15nm north that may offer protection, and after that you’re within sight of Langkawi. From here onwards you can do day-hops all the way up to Phuket, but keep an eye on the weather and sea-state during the SW monsoon.

    There are a few commercial ports you could consider. Klang comes to mind, which is up a river and behind a large island. You can anchor east of that island quite safely. There is nowhere protected in Malaka and there is a large cable running between the small islands there. The marina is disused. Some people have used it but it offers little protection and has silted. A shame, really, as Malaka town is fascinating.

    CHECKING IN

    Malaysia requires you to check in and out of each port, if you go into a marina. Some people, ourselves included, have managed to avoid the odd port whilst going up the coast. We never checked into Pangkor, for example, but when you do, it’s easy enough and the staff are always friendly and helpful.

    ***

    OK, so that’s my first brain-dump giving you an over-view of what to expect. Of course there are many, many waypoints, routes and anchorages to consider, too many to mention here. Best thing to do would be to get a pilot guide and Navionics and find a few places you think would make a good anchorage, then ask us for our opinion on them. Feel free to ask any questions.

    Peace and fair winds!

    May 25, 2020 at 8:40 am#46909
    wbilko
    Bosun
    @wbilko

    Hi, Jamie

    Wow, thanks very much for all the great info!  Hopefully you can or have saved it into a template for the next newbie!
    The only question I have is where you found to be your best source online for boat parts/supplies. I’ve been using mostly Defender in the States.
    No other questions for now, but apologize for my late response. Apparently I’m not being notified of messages as I thought I was to be. I’ll recheck my settings.

    How are your plans coming?  South China Sea could be interesting😳.

    Thanks again, and also loving your new series, as we’re also trying to fix all the previous owner’s screwed-up stuff in our boat, and there’s a lot hidden away!

    Cheers, Wayne

    May 25, 2020 at 10:22 am#46910
    Jamie
    Skipper
    @jamie-ftb

    Hi Wayne,

    Please let me know if there is an issue with getting notifications as I’d like to look into this.

    Re parts, it depends where you are. In Langkawi there is a chandlers at RLYC who will deliver, whilst Phuket has many outlets. Ordering from the States or Australia, however, is quite normal and many of us still do this. For importing into Malaysia you should try and get parts delivered by DHL only, as they clear customs without issue. UPS and others have been known to get stuck in customs and it’s a pain having to pay customs fees (they won’t notify you, for example, you just have to guess!).

    Hope the refit retrospective is keeping your inspiration and motivation up to tackle those jobs on board!

    Peace and fair winds!

    May 26, 2020 at 3:44 pm#46918
    wbilko
    Bosun
    @wbilko

    Hi, Jamie

    Thanks again for more info.

    I have gone through my notification settings on FTB, and they appear to be set to email me if there’s any messages, but alas I have not received any such notices of your recent replies.
    Cheers, Wayne

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.