• October 31, 2019 at 11:27 am#41506
    Jamie
    Skipper
    @jamie-ftb

    Goose wing, or wing on wing, what do you call it? We show you how to sail wing on wing using a polled-out genoa and prevented main (or mizzen). And we end up sailing in a squall.

    Just as we think this sailing life can’t get any better, we head into trouble sailing into a rocky anchorage just as a squall hits. With reefs sprinkling the seabed, it’s just about the worst place for our genoa furler to seize. We jump into action and end up having to pull down the sail in gale force winds.

    Watch it on youtube here.

    Peace and fair winds!

    October 31, 2019 at 10:26 pm#41522
    Danny Basso
    Deckhand
    @danny

    I call it “andatura a farfalla” which means butterfly …magical combination, experience and a cool head ( we say cold blood)

    November 9, 2019 at 11:31 pm#41864
    Peter Haliburton
    Deckhand
    @jphaliburton

    I have a love-hate relationship with furling. It is really convenient, especially when sailing solo, but I’ve seen so many people have issues with them, and like you, usually at the worst possible time. My current boat doesn’t have furling, but I’m sure anything bigger I may get will. I wrote a blog post about it a couple years ago.

    Serenity with a reefing jib in a deck bag.

    Living and sailing in Newfoundland, Canada

    November 10, 2019 at 12:26 am#41872
    Jamie
    Skipper
    @jamie-ftb

    I call it “andatura a farfalla” which means butterfly …magical combination, experience and a cool head ( we say cold blood)

    I’d not heard of ‘butterfly’ until we posted this up on FB. Quite a few people came back with this term. I really like it.

    Peace and fair winds!

    November 10, 2019 at 12:29 am#41873
    Jamie
    Skipper
    @jamie-ftb

    I wrote a blog post about it a couple years ago.

    @jphaliburton – Nice little article, Peter, and I do agree with your general sentiments. As you say, they fail at the worst of times.

    We often get asked how often our in-mast furling gear fails but never get asked about the headsail, and yet in 14 years the main only ever got stuck once. That was when we were newbies and didn’t know how to furl it away properly. Meanwhile we’ve had a few issues with out headsail, normally halyard wrap, and the mechanism isn’t easy to access for servicing either.

    Peace and fair winds!

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