• July 6, 2020 at 12:40 am#47370
    Peter V
    Bosun
    @peterv

    ahoy matey’s

     

    a week ago i spent three lovely lovely days sailing the coast of my country (holland) with a friend on his sailboat (Helmsman 35) and we even spent the night at anchor in front of my own town – the beach i know so well!!

    we anchored with enough chain and rope, we did use the engine to make sure the hook had dug itself in. and  the next morning we were caught with the line alongside the keel. after using the ruther both ways (port/starboard) we got free, and were happily swinging behind the anchor

    my question is: how do you prevent this? (is this by fixing the ruther in a neutral position – which would make sense?

    July 7, 2020 at 11:52 am#47378
    Jamie
    Skipper
    @jamie-ftb

    Hi Peter, thanks for posting.

    My first thought was that this was caused by the two different types of rode you were using. We don’t have experience of anchoring with line and chain, only chain, but I suspect this could be part of the problem. Do you happen to know if it was a floating line? If so I suspect it wasn’t sinking or being pulled down by the weight of the chain.

    Also if the boat doesn’t have a skeg to keep the line away from the prop this is more likely to happen. It can be an issue if you start the engine and put the boat into gear before weighing that line.

    It’s possible you had wind over tide too. That is, the anchor ends up underneath the boat as the wind pushes the boat the opposite way to the tide. This has happened to us and the trick is to put the boat into astern rather than forward, but of course you don’t want to do this if the line is wrapped around the rudder. Another option is the raise the main and use that to swing the boat into wind and away from the anchor.

    When at anchor always make sure you leave your rudder centred, and if you can, lock the wheel off so it doesn’t move.

    Of course, the obvious solution is to use all chain and do away with the line, but that may not be practical. If you have to use a line, nylon is the best as it stretches and it sinks.

    Peace and fair winds!

    July 14, 2020 at 1:13 am#47488
    Peter V
    Bosun
    @peterv

    Thx Jamie,

     

     

    August 21, 2020 at 1:02 am#47686
    Keith Giunta
    Bosun
    @raenman66

    Jamie might have hit upon the most likely problems:  line vs all chain and rudder not on a skeg.  SailboatData.com for the HELMSMAN 35 lists a fin keel but not rudder on a skeg.  It normally does list rudder on the skeg when there is one.  Unfortunately, the datasheet posted does not include a drawing for this boat which, when present, clarifies the layout.

    Keith Giunta

    August 23, 2020 at 11:28 am#47693
    Susan King
    Helmsman
    @beachgirl

    I learn so many useful boating things from FTB ! Thank you for the question and the answere.  I did not  know this about chain. Its like  Chapman”s Practical Boat series  !

    August 23, 2020 at 12:11 pm#47694
    Susan King
    Helmsman
    @beachgirl

    my question is : how reliable are the mobil phone gps app s for monitoring anchor drag with an alarm ?

    September 12, 2020 at 10:11 am#47790
    Jamie
    Skipper
    @jamie-ftb

    my question is : how reliable are the mobil phone gps app s for monitoring anchor drag with an alarm ?

    They’re quite reliable, Susan. One of the issues with those things is if the GPS drops out or you lose some of your GPS satellites. What tends to happen is that the accuracy of your position drops and you appear to ‘jump’ around the chart. This doesn’t happen often and one could argue the same would happen on the ship’s GPS but some phones are more susceptible to this issue.

    TBH, we don’t use an anchor alarm. I am the anchor alarm! If the anchorage is dodgy or the weather picks up, I tend to go on anchor watch myself. If the anchor is in good and you are confident with your ground tackle, there should be no reason to use an anchor alarm. Still, it’s a useful tool to have and I’m not writing them off.

    Peace and fair winds!

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