Esper Refit 8 – holes in deck; galley is tomato orange

Local fishermen haul in their nets before lifting the boat

This week we get to play with a new toy whilst the painters cover the topsides with a high build paint. Frustratingly we discover a rather unpleasant hole in the deck but at least the galley’s now covered in tomato and aluminium.

Local fishermen haul in their nets before lifting the boat

Local fishermen haul in their nets before lifting the boat

Quick Summary Video

For those too lazy to read any further you can catch up on this week’s progress via the following video clip.

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Discovering Holes

After removing the deck we found a curious bit of filling at the back of the cabin. It’s difficult to work out if this was just the way the boat was built, or if it’s a retro-fitted extension to the cabin roof. Either way it’s the possible cause of our leak in the cabin so we set to and ground out the crack. Upon doing so we unearthed some soft fibreglass that was still so damp you could pull it away with your fingers.

We set to and ground it all out and refilled it with epoxy and glassfibre.

The vertical crack to the right was ground out, whilst the horizontal filler was removed and replaced. The hole was plugged and filled too. The corner will now be built up with glassfibre to strengthen this area

The vertical crack to the right was ground out, whilst the horizontal filler was removed and replaced. The hole was plugged and filled too. The corner will now be built up with glassfibre to strengthen this area

Taking Moisture Readings

It’s been a few weeks since Esper was hauled so it’s about time we started taking moisture readings. Fortunately they’re pretty low, somewhere between eight to fifteen percent, but we’ll continue to monitor this over the next few weeks. No photos of this but check the video clip out for further explanation of the process.

Planning The Electrics

This week we began discussions with the electrician. The first task was to draw up our electrical requirements on a floor plan printed out on an A3 sheet of paper.

Drawing up our electrical plan

Drawing up our electrical plan

Plan 1 illustrates the location of the mains sockets and the wall lights; Plan 2 gives the location of the LED strip lights and ceiling spots; Plan 3 highlights the location of every item that appears in the breaker panel. Doing this gives a simple-to-follow visual presentation to the electrician. Fortunately Sombat speaks good English so we’re able to work on this project together.

Tomato And Aluminium Formica

As already alluded to Pong has begun to fit the Formica in the galley. We’ve opted for a brushed aluminium effect on the cupboards and thrown up some tomato orange Formica on the back wall, just for a bit of fun. Well, why not, eh?

The Formica in the galley

The Formica in the galley

We’ve also been looking at ways of reducing the yellow in the solid ash trim. One possible solution will be to paint the bare wood with a water-based emulsion, rub it in with a cloth, and sand it back once more. This keeps the pattern of the grain but whitens the wood. The test, however, will be to see how well this holds when sprayed with polyurethane.

High Building The Top Sides

The painters have fared the Jotamastic 87 primer and this week they applied a high build over the top of it. This is a thick paint that helps fill in the pits, dents and imperfections in the top sides.

High build has been applied to the topsides

High build has been applied to the topsides

After applying the high build the painters went round once more with a black aerosol. This acts as a guide when faring the high build, where any black paint left will indicate dents in the surface.

After the high build was applied the painters went round with a black aerosol and fared over it once more

After the high build was applied the painters went round with a black aerosol and fared over it once more

Fishermen Hauling Nets

Before we leave you this week we thought you might be interested in this little clip. Before fishing boats are hauled out they have to dump their nets by the slip. Here’s a clip showing a bit of team work amongst the fishermen.

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What’s Next?

We were told on Saturday that the painters will be ready to spray the Awlgrip 545 undercoat on Monday! Can’t believe how fast they are moving but they have been filling and faring now for four weeks. I’m hoping that most of the glass fibre work has been done so the painters will be moving on to the deck. They’ve got a lot of work ahead of them.





2 Comments on “Esper Refit 8 – holes in deck; galley is tomato orange”

  1. Good progress.  Not to bring you down but it once took me 2 years to dry out my boat.  But that was when it was in the Pacific North West!  Hope yours goes faster than mine did.  
    Oh yes, love the commentary but thought you might spruce up the clothes a little if you are the roving reporter. Ha, ha!

    1. Two years? Perish the thought! As for the clothes, I’ll have to dig out my blazer and mic for the reporting bit. Stay tuned 😉

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