Anchorages Around Fethiye and Goçek

Pilloried Cove, looking north east

Pilloried Cove, looking north east


To start breaking down anchorages would take up too much beer time (talking of which, it’s coming up beer o’clock). We’ve done a few and most require tying a line to the shore or taking a mooring line on a jetty. We were rather inexperienced at both but after a few attempts we are now allowed to officially laugh at the charterers making the same mistakes we did a month previously!


Pilloried Cove again. We had only just ducked in here when a squall kicked up and had boats in the bay running for cover. Twenty minutes after this shot was taken the anchorage was packed!

Pilloried Cove again. We had only just ducked in here when a squall kicked up and had boats in the bay running for cover. Twenty minutes after this shot was taken the anchorage was packed!


Most of the anchorages are deep right up until the shore, requiring a good 40-50m of chain. If taking a mooring line make sure you’ve tied it properly because the odd unexpected gust can find your transom kissing the jetty. Sounds obvious but some mooring lines are quite short and therefore difficult to tie up to properly.

 

Some of the anchorages not only host gullets, who are normally well behaved, but also the day-tripper boats. These can be both an eye and ear-sore, but have patience. Firstly most of the customers are Turks, and some might say they have more of a right to be there than you do! Secondly they only stay for half an hour at a time and thirdly they peak at 2pm and all is quiet by 4pm, leaving you in an idyllic, quiet anchorage for the rest of the evening.

 

Tomb Bay (Tasyaka)
36 41.8N 028 52.0E


Some of the tombs of Tomb Bay

Some of the tombs of Tomb Bay

 

Marcus at one of the tombs, which may be climbed to from the small beach. Don't forget water. Lots of it.

Marcus at one of the tombs, which may be climbed to from the small beach. Don't forget water. Lots of it.

View from the tomb looking out south east. Esper is just poking her nose out at the bottom of the pic.

View from the tomb looking out south east. Esper is just poking her nose out at the bottom of the photograph.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tersane Adasi
36 40.65N 028 54.9E


tersaneUnfortunately for us Tersane will always be associated with losing our cat! (More on that later on in the log.) Don’t worry, it has a happy ending, which is just as well because we couldn’t bear the idea of not being able to return to this idyllic spot. Before I harp on about what a great little island this is I should just warn you that it is on the route of the day-tripper boats and by 2pm the small bay is packed with gullets dropping their anchor chains on top of one another. Fortunately by 4pm it’s settled down and all that remains are the few boats tied to shore or on the jetty. The only noise now is the shrill of cicadas and the occassional bark of the owner’s gun dogs.



palmThis is a family-run affair and chatting to the owner in pigeon-Turglish, which, surprisingly, with a few hand gestures, actually makes for an engaging conversation, I discover that his mother has lived on the island for 40 years. I didn’t ever catch his name but his wife, who looks as young as their daughter, is Yesim (pron Yey-shim). She speaks enough English to be undertood. Your lines, should you tie up to the jetty, will probably be taken by her 9 year old nephew. Don’t worry, he knows what he’s doing!


Yesim will come round the jetty at 7pm to take meat orders for 8-8.30pm. On our first visit they spit-roasted a whole lamb, paraded it around the restaurant and then cut it off in hunks. It helps if you hang out with Gina from ‘Impulse’ who carries a handy jar of mint sauce with her!


kay







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